Story Of The Rear Column Of The Emin Pasha Relief Expedition..

JAMESON, JAMES S. JAMESON, ETHEL, EDITED BY..

Bound in original green cloth, gilt with decoration on front board. Extremities a little worn. Title page and frontispiece foxed and damp stain to inner edge of frontispiece; otherwise a very good copy.

£200.00

Publisher

R. H. Porter, 18 Princes Street, Cavendish Square.,

Place

London

Date

1890

Synopsis

By the late james s. jameson, naturalist to the expedition. edited by mrs. j. s. jameson. with portrait, map, and illustrations from the author's sketches.

Item Description

FIRST EDITION. 8vo 6 x 8.75 inches. xxxii + [ii] + 455 pp. + [1].

Illustrations

Illustrated by portrait frontispiece and 96 half tone sketches by author, including 17 whole page, by two folding facsimile letters and by folding coloured map of the Congo River in two sections at the end.

Notes

An edited account of the diaries and letters of James Sligo Jameson (1856-88), hunter, naturalist and African traveller. It relates the activities of the Rear Column of the expedition led by H. M. Stanley, the famous explorer, to relieve, Emin Pasha (1840-92), the European ruler of the Equatoria province of the Sudan under threat from the Mahdist forces which had overrun the remainder of the country. While Stanley went ahead, the Rear Column remained behind in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo, based at Yambuya under the command of Major Barttelot, ostensibly to await the supply of further porters by Tippu Tib, an Arab slaver. Jameson's role was as naturalist to the expedition. Jameson, however, died of fever at Bangala and hence the book was prepared for publication by his widow, the natural history appendices being contributed by other naturalists. The end of the expedition was marked by controversy. Stanley's criticism of the Rear Column's activities on his return to England in 1890 is refuted in Andrew Jameson's preface. The most serious charge laid by Stanley was that Jameson had connived at the performance of act of cannibalism of a young female slave at Riba-Riba (see page 291 for Jameson's version) in order to provide material for his sketches and diary. Scarce copy of an account of the last major European expedition to the interior of Africa.

[Stock No. 22190]

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