The History And Antiquities Of The Colleges And Halls In The University Of Oxford.

WOOD, ANTONY. GUTCH, JOHN, EDITED BY.

£200.00

Publisher

At The Clarendon Press: Printed for the Editor.

Place

Oxford

Date

1786

Item Description

FIRST EDITION. 4to. 8.5 x 10.25 inches. [xvi] + 692 pp. [i.e. 690 as last two pages misnumbered). Bound in contemporary calf, spine rebacked, preserving original, decorated gilt, with contrasting maroon morocco title label, gilt, History and Antiquities of Oxford. Extremities worn and scattered foxing; otherwise a very good copy. Armourial bookplate of Alexander Meyrick Broadley, The Knapp, Bradpole, 1895 on first free endpaper. Early ink note on the later part published in The Gentleman's Magazine, 1794 and 1796. Illustrated by text figure. A history of each college or hall precedes lists of benefactors, of the principals under their various titles, of the bishops educated there, and an account of buildings with a detailed transcription of monumental inscriptions. Anthony Wood (1632-95), born and educated in Oxford (MA 1655) also published, in 1674, a History of the University in Latin and translated and expanded an English version which he left to the University; this and the Athen? Oxonienses of Oxford educated writers (1721) forming a valuable source of early information on the institution. It was left to John Gutch (1746-1831), Chaplain of All Souls College for over sixty years, to prepare Wood's revised English version of The History and Antiquities for publication. Further details are given in the Preface, which states that this work is the second division of the second part of the manuscript of the History. An appendix was added in 1790. This copy was owned by Alexander Meyrick Broadley (1847-1916), barrister, known as 'Broadley Pasha' for his role in defending an Egyptian nationalist in Cairo. Broadley had a colourful career and was twice involved in homosexual scandals, the first resulting in his exile from India to Tunis and the second from London to Paris and Brussels. Eventually he settled back in his home village, Bradpole in Dorset, where he had his house, The Knapp constructed, and pursued his interest in book collecting.

[Stock No. 26164]

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