The Camera Lucida In Art And Science.

HAMMOND, JOHN H. AND AUSTIN, JILL.

£12.00

Publisher

Adam Hilger.

Place

Bristol

Date

1987

Item Description

4to. 10 x 7.75 inches. xii + 201 pp. Bound in original brown cloth, in pictorial dust wrapper, which has a slightly sunned spine; otherwise a very good copy. Illustrated by portrait frontispiece and by numerous text figures. Decorated by publisher's device on title page. The camera lucinda is an optical device used as a drawing aid by artists and microscopists. It was invented by William Hyde Wollaston (1766-1828), chemist and physicist 1806. Until recently it was used in microscopy as as drawing from it was a cheaper alternative to taking photomicrographs. Wollaston, educated at Cambridge, abandoned the practice of medicine and discovered the elements palladium and rhodium in 1802-04 while working on the purifying of platinum. In addition to optics, he also carried out important work in electricity. This detailed historical discovery is by John Hammond, formerly of the Ministry of Agriculture and Jill Austin, School of Environmental Studies, University of East Anglia.

[Stock No. 27078]

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