British Intelligence In The Second World War.

HINSLEY, F. H. AND SIMKINS, C. A. G.

£20.00

Publisher

Her Majesty's Stationery Office.

Place

London

Date

1990

Synopsis

Volume four security and counter-intelligence. by f. h. hinsley, fellow of st john's college and emeritus professor of the history of international relations in the university of cambridge and c. a. g. simkins, sometime scholar of new college oxford and of lincoln's inn, barrister-at-law. (history of the second world war).

Item Description

Large 8vo. 6.5 x 9.75 inches. xii + 408 pp. Bound in original green cloth, gilt, with contrasting black title label, gilt, in dust wrapper, with a little lower edge wear, including chip at tail of spine; otherwise a very good copy. This fourth volume on the history of British wartime intelligence, analyses the work of the authorities responsible for countering the threats of subversion, sabotage and intelligence gathering by the enemy. It describes the situation at the outbreak of war and how the security intelligence agencies evolved and became efficient, with help from signals intelligence and the skilful use of double cross agents. The volume contains fifteen appendices. Harry Hinsley (1918-98), historian and cryptanalyst, worked at Bletchley Park during the war and was editor of the entire wartime intelligence series published 1979-90

[Stock No. 26754]

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